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cbc oil for pain

The effects of CBD oil should come within 20 minutes, with benefits lasting for four to six hours, depending on your dosage and metabolism.

THC binds to cannabinoid receptors in the brain, mimicking the actions of a similarly built chemical produced by the brain (anandamide), hence the psychoactive effects.

How to Use CBD Oil for Pain

CO2 is used as a solvent that changes its state from gas to liquid, penetrating the plant and extracting cannabinoids from it. Eventually, the CO2 will dissipate, leaving behind an oily, viscous extract.

Alternative extraction methods include olive oil or alcohol (tinctures). Steer clear of CBD oil that was made with butane, as this solvent is difficult to work with and may leave toxic residue at the bottom of your oil if handled improperly.

It doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t use topicals at all. In fact, they make for a great addition to CBD oil because they approach the problem from a slightly different angle.

Research shows that even doses up to one and a half grams have no severe side effects on human health (9).

When we injure ourselves, cells in the immediate vicinity begin releasing compounds that trigger a cascade of inflammation and sensory activation — which is what triggers the pain transmission.

A study conducted on animals at Cajan Institute tested the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD on mice the researchers wanted to find out if CBD can provide a reversed inflammatory response on those cells. After ten days, the researchers found a reduction in inflammatory markers with a rodent encephalitis model designed to imitate the impact MS has on the body (5).

3. CBD and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Pain

however, there’s a problem with these solvents.

The entire Medterra’s product range is tested in a third-party laboratory for their CBD content and safety.

How does all of this relate to pain? The answer lies in the way pain is transmitted to the brain.

Every company has the option to send their products to an independent lab or third-party testing.

Given the ongoing challenges of chronic pain management coupled with the consequences of the opioid epidemic, pain management practitioners and their patients are searching for effective and safer alternatives to opioids to alleviate pain. With the legalization of marijuana in many states and resulting cultural acceptance of this drug for recreational and medical use, there has been an increased interest in using cannabis for a myriad of medical problems, including pain.

CBD is emerging as a promising pharmaceutical agent to treat pain, inflammation, seizures, and anxiety without the psychoactive effects of THC. Our understanding of the role of CBD in pain management continues to evolve, and evidence from animal studies has shown that CBD exerts its pain-relieving effects through its various interactions and modulation of the endocannabinoid, inflammatory, and nociceptive (pain sensing) systems. The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid receptors that interact with our own naturally occurring cannabinoids. This system is involved in regulating many functions in the body, including metabolism and appetite, mood and anxiety, and pain perception.

People are looking for novel, nonaddictive ways to treat pain

Given the rapid change in the legality of cannabis coupled with the increased appetite for something new, and driven by unprecedented profit margins, the advertising for cannabinoids in general and CBD in particular has gone wild. The FDA is very clear that it is illegal to market CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement. And it warns the public about its potential side effects, as it’s often advertised in a way that may lead people to mistakenly believe using CBD “can’t hurt.” CBD can cause liver injury, and can affect the male reproductive system (as demonstrated in laboratory animal studies).

Most importantly, CBD can interact with other important medications like blood thinners, heart medications, and immunosuppressants (medications given after organ transplantation), potentially changing the levels of these important medications in the blood and leading to catastrophic results, including death. Also, more information needs to be gathered about its safety in special populations such as the elderly, children, those who are immunocompromised, and pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Finally, there is anecdotal wisdom, when experiences by patients and health professionals have positive results. While the experience or medication could be beneficial, that doesn’t mean it is going to work for everyone. That’s because each and every person is unique, and what works perfectly for one patient could have no effect on another patient. This is especially true for pain, where many other factors (our mood and stress level, our environment and other medical conditions, and our previous experiences) can affect the perception of pain. Please be careful, and keep in mind that some of these incredible-sounding testimonials are merely marketing materials meant to lure consumers to buy more products, as the CBD market is expected to hit $20 billion by 2024.