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cbd for bone pain

There’s no one-size-fits-all dose of CBD for arthritis. Start with a small dose (10-15 mg), pay attention to the effects for the next few hours, and increase as needed.

The most common method of using CBD is sublingual — putting drops of CBD oil under your tongue. This method bypasses the digestive tract by avoiding stomach acid and liver degradation, which greatly enhances the blood levels and the effectiveness of CBD.

There isn’t one dosage of CBD that will work in all cases. We’re all different and the right amount of CBD to take will depend on how much you weigh, your unique genetics, the severity of your arthritis, and the kind of CBD product you’re taking.

Frequently Asked Questions

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Medterra publishes detailed third-party lab test reports of its products. The company is also certified by the U.S. Hemp Authority, which means it passed a strict independent audit confirming that it follows strict hemp manufacturing standards.

Lord Jones is a reputable supplier of CBD that ships different products depending on your zip code to ensure that the CBD you are receiving is legal in your state, whether marijuana is legal there or not.

The legality of CBD in the United States has caused some confusion regarding CBD’s relation to marijuana. Let’s break it down:

If you’re interested in trying CBD for the first time, start at a low dose, such as 5 milligrams, and go from there. It’s important to remember that you will not feel the effects of ingestibles immediately. Even if you don’t notice anything in the first few hours, don’t consume more on the first try, as you can always increase your dosage later, but not reduce it once you have already ingested it.

Is CBD legal?

The symptoms experienced with OA encompass inflammatory, nociceptive, and neuropathic pain. CBD is an exogenous (out of the body) cannabinoid that acts on our endogenous (in the body) cannabinoid system to function in an antioxidant capacity, decrease inflammation and act as an analgesic.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting more than twenty million Americans. OA is a degenerative joint disease, defined by loss of joint smoothness and range of motion due to increased bone density and bone growths (osteophytes). OA is further defined by:

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound that is found in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, which is another compound from the same plant, CBD is not psychotropic, and therefore does not create the “high” that the plant is more typically known for.

Historically, osteoarthritis has been thought of as a non-inflammatory arthritis, however, recent evidence showcases the role of inflammation in the symptoms of OA, as well as in the condition’s progression. Intervention with CBD may offer an opportunity to slow the progression of OA by decreasing inflammation, both systematically and locally. The interaction of CBD with your immune system and its potential antioxidant affect may help to decrease symptoms associated with OA and improve quality of life.

What’s the evidence it works? And what do experts recommend? Until recently, there’s been little research and even less guidance for people (or their doctors) interested in CBD products that are now increasingly legal and widely promoted.

There is one definite downside: cost. Prices range widely but CBD products aren’t inexpensive, and depending on dose, frequency, and formulation, the cost can be considerable — I found one brand that was $120/month, and health insurance does not usually cover it.

What’s the evidence that CBD is effective for chronic arthritis pain?

As with any treatment, there can be downsides. CBD is generally considered safe; however, it can still cause lightheadedness, sleepiness, dry mouth, and rarely, liver problems. There may be uncertainty about the potency or purity of CBD products (since they are not regulated as prescription medications are), and CBD can interact with other medications. For pregnant women, concern has been raised about a possible link between inhaled cannabis and lower-birthweight babies; it’s not clear if this applies to CBD. Some pain specialists have concerns that CBD may upset the body’s natural system of pain regulation, leading to tolerance (so that higher doses are needed for the same effect), though the potential for addiction is generally considered to be low.

In addition, individuals experience pain and respond to treatment in different ways. As a result, it’s highly unlikely that there is a single CBD-containing product that works for all people with all types of arthritis.

Of course, there is anecdotal evidence and testimonials galore, including reports of dramatic improvement by people who tried CBD in its various forms (including capsule, liquid, topical, and spray) for their pain. But we are still waiting for well-designed, scientifically valid, and rigorous clinical trials (such as this one in progress) that are so badly needed to answer the question of just how helpful CBD may be to people with chronic arthritis pain.