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cbd negative effects

Because it is so widely available and recommended for so many problems, it must be used carefully and purchased from reliable sources.

There are also studies of oral, topical, and inhaled CBD for use in many other conditions including: dystonia (movement disorder), Fragile X syndrome (rare genetic disorder), graft-versus-host disease (bone marrow transplant rejection), multiple sclerosis (MS), opioid withdrawal, schizophrenia, and smoking cessation. CBD is also used to alleviate Parkinson’s symptoms, but there are some studies that advise against it.

Reviews and meta-analyses of cannabinoids found the following:

Does Oral CBD Help with Sleep?

An app was used to measure changes in insomnia in over 400 people taking medical cannabis. The average symptom severity was reduced by 4.5 points on a 10-point scale, a significant improvement in insomnia.

Studies of CBD are ongoing, but some benefits have been found.

Another review with meta-analysis of 104 studies evaluated cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain. Within this review and analysis, the effect of cannabinoids on sleep was also examined. There was low-quality evidence of improved sleep.

The National Academies of Sciences (NAS) found significant evidence that cannabis was an effective treatment for long-term (chronic) pain. However, much of the research was done outside of the U.S. And the forms of cannabis studied in the U.S. were not the same as those commonly used.

She adds, “[Another difference is that] CBD is derived from hemp and has been classified as a legal substance. Hemp has <0.3% THC. Conversely, cannabis plants such as marijuana are grown to have much higher levels of THC and are still illegal according to the FDA, although individual states vary as to their use.”

“CBD is not an intoxicating substance, whereas THC is a psychoactive that can get you high,” explains Dr. Jas Matharu-Daley, a physician and consultant for a brand that specializes in CBD production.

Because CBD supplements come in so many different forms—such as oils, gummies, tinctures, and vapors—the amount that’s actually absorbed can vary drastically. This, combined with each person, will ultimately affect which (if any) CBD side effects you might experience.

Nausea

CBD—the abbreviation for cannabidiol, a substance that’s generally derived from the hemp plant—has skyrocketed in popularity over the last five years. In fact, according to some research, “CBD” as a Google search term remained stable from 2004 to 2014 but has since ballooned by up to 605%.

It’s important to point out that CBD is not regulated by the FDA and therefore dosages might not be accurate. It’s also difficult to know what an appropriate dose is the first time you try a new product.

CBD is technically an unregulated substance in the United States and therefore it ought to be used with caution. This is especially important for those taking additional medications and/or those with ongoing medical issues. That said, preliminary research on CBD and its benefits are promising in relation to helping with mild to moderate health concerns and it is generally considered a safe substance. Health professionals do not consider CBD a cure-all for serious medical issues, including cancer.

CBD might interfere with the other medications you take. Dr. Matharu-Daley says it’s important to talk to your doctor about whether CBD could affect your existing prescriptions.

You take prescription drugs. (Could be important) Pharmaceutical drugs are processed by your body in different ways; some are less effective after processing, while others aren’t effective until after they’ve been processed. Similar to grapefruits, CBD can occupy enzymes (cytochrome p450) that your body uses to process certain pharmaceutical drugs. Taking CBD alongside these pharmaceuticals could pose a health risk by either increasing or decreasing levels of these medications in your bloodstream. If you currently take prescription drugs — particularly *any that come with a warning not to consume with grapefruit* such as warfarin, anti-epileptics, HIV antivirals, chemotherapy and others — we suggest speaking with a medical professional before incorporating CBD into your wellness routine. They could help you understand potential interactions and how to proceed.

CBD critics are absolutely correct when they state that definitive clinical evidence is lacking to recommend CBD for many of the reasons people currently take CBD products. CBD is currently available as an FDA-approved prescription treatment (called Epidiolex) for two rare forms of childhood epilepsy. But in order to gather the clinical evidence required for this status, the manufacturer needed to pay for almost two decades of research and clinical trials.

For many of us, it may seem as though cannabidiol (CBD) sprang up out of nowhere. Within a few short years, this obscure molecule found in cannabis plants has moved from near-anonymity to a cure-all embraced by millions.

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Side effects based on high-dose clinical trials

Although CBD might be a new molecule to you, scientists have been studying it since the 1970’s, alongside its infamous sister molecule, THC. For the past few decades, lawyers, doctors, patients and politicians have all been pitting the medical potential of cannabis against its risk for recreational abuse. But all the while, evidence has been mounting that CBD offers similar — if not better — medical benefits without the downside of a “high” from THC.

You’re trying to conceive. (Not enough evidence) Natural cannabinoids are produced and used throughout our bodies as messengers. One of their most important uses is to help our bodies coordinate conception and pregnancy . At the moment, it’s a complete mystery what extra cannabinoids do to our bodies’ reproductive capabilities. Some evidence suggests that regular cannabis users have slightly lower fertility rates , although more comprehensive assessments of the data generally agree that this effect is minimal at most — and is more likely caused by THC than CBD. However, if you are having difficulty conceiving, discuss your use of CBD or cannabis products with your doctor.

Here’s what the evidence shows about taking CBD if: