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Overall, THC-free CBD oil is safe with few, if any, adverse effects. However, some people may experience mild side effects, but this can typically be reduced by lowering the dosage as needed. 

One of the main reasons people choose THC-free CBD oil is that it will not show up on a drug test, as some full-spectrum CBD products can. This allows you to take CBD during work hours to reduce anxiety and improve sleep without having to worry about it impacting your job duties and responsibilities. CBD oil is also legal in all U.S. states and easily accessible in most, though certain states have varying degrees of restriction. And since these CBD products contain no THC, they don't require certifications or recommendations from a physician to consume or purchase them.

 Other things to consider:

What to look for in THC-free CBD oil

As mentioned before, THC-free CBD oil allows you to enjoy the benefits of cannabis without any THC. All CBD products in the U.S. are legally required to contain less than 0.3 percent THC, but some people prefer to leave it out altogether.

If you've been considering adding CBD to your wellness routine but are concerned about possible side effects, THC-free CBD oil is a great place to start. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the part of the cannabis plant that's responsible for psychoactive effect (in other words, the feeling of being 'high'). While some types of CBD, or cannabidiol oil, contain very trace amounts of THC, an oil that's completely THC-free ensures you're not ingesting even the tiniest bit of the ingredient. This way, you can enjoy the benefits of CBD without worrying about any psychoactive effects that may impede your work or home activities.

When you're starting to take any CBD product, you'll want to begin with a very low dose and gradually increase only as tolerated. The amount of CBD a person may take in a day will vary depending on weight, how long you have been taking CBD, and the desired effect, for example. Research shows that those with anxiety may require single doses of 300 to 600 milligrams daily to feel benefit. You should work with your healthcare provider to find the dose that is right for you. 

When choosing a THC-free CBD oil product, it's important to consider factors such as the type of hemp extract used (specifically, broad-spectrum versus CBD isolate), as well as where the hemp was grown (those grown overseas are not as tightly regulated as in the U.S.). States such as Colorado have especially strong hemp programs that spot-test hemp plants in the field to check THC levels and will investigate the use of any illegal pesticides.

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

How is cannabidiol different from marijuana?

CBD has been touted for a wide variety of health issues, but the strongest scientific evidence is for its effectiveness in treating some of the cruelest childhood epilepsy syndromes, such as Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), which typically don’t respond to antiseizure medications. In numerous studies, CBD was able to reduce the number of seizures, and, in some cases, it was able to stop them altogether. Videos of the effects of CBD on these children and their seizures are readily available on the Internet for viewing, and they are quite striking. Recently the FDA approved the first ever cannabis-derived medicine for these conditions, Epidiolex, which contains CBD.

CBD is commonly used to address anxiety, and for patients who suffer through the misery of insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both falling asleep and staying asleep.

CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.