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cbd oil before and after

There are still plenty of studies to be done, but so far science has shown that CBD appears to target more than 65 areas in the brain and body that are involved in regulating pain, mood, and sleep. Notably, CBD interacts with our endocannabinoid system, enhancing and balancing the messages sent via endocannabinoids and neurotransmitters. By doing so, it has the potential to lower inflammation, ease pain, bring a sense of calm, help those coping with anxiety, and improve sleep.

Could all this pain-free movement have been a result of the placebo effect? Sure. But I like to think my inflammation was kept in check by my new CBD regimen. Still, I'm no medical expert, so I reached out to Staci Gruber, PhD, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core and the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery program at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts. She told me that anecdotal evidence and pre-clinical trials suggest CBD helps with pain and inflammation, but "we don't have clinical trial data."

I began taking a one-milliliter dropperful of oil, containing 66.7 milligrams of CBD, morning and night. There isn't an industry-standard recommended dose, so I started with the brand's lowest potency. I held the drop under my tongue for a minute or so, in order for the cannabidiol to seep into my bloodstream rather than get digested (which is also a good delivery system—just not as direct). It tasted fine, sort of neutral, with a hint of plant life.

I want all those things. Inflammation can lead to aches, pains, and acne, and—yes, at the age of 47—I'd be happy to get rid of them. Given that my husband and son have nicknamed me Yelly Melly, I'm guessing I could also do with a deeper sense of calm. And I'm a busy working mom, so sure, I'll take better sleep!

Inspired by my reduced chronic pain and stress-free slumber, I also started getting up at 5:50 a.m. for a brisk 2-mile walk with my neighbor every morning. And yeah, I'm still taking barre and yoga classes. I've got energy for everything!

Remember how we’ve mentioned bioavailability of CBD and how it varies depending on the delivery method? Here’s a brief summary on it below:

Unlike what you may think, we don’t absorb the full amount of CBD in each serving, but rather, we can only absorb as much CBD as is possible according to the bioavailability of the product.

The question of the day is this: should you be taking CBD oil before or after you eat? This answer may have a bigger impact on CBD’s benefits than one might think. We look to answer this question today and more with our guide on what the best time is for taking CBD oil.

On most CBD oil bottles, the label has directions for how to use the oil. Most say to take the oil with food – but never specifies on whether that should be taken before, during, or after the meal. Some labels, including that of our CBD Tinctures, suggest to take the oil sublingually, or under the tongue, and hold in mouth for up to 60 seconds before swallowing.

With CBD oil and other CBD products at an all-time high with popularity surging across the country, estimates about its popularity are only growing. Therefore, this poses a ton of questions that are still largely unanswered when it comes to cannabidiol and how well it can work for a variety of issues.