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cbd oil concussion

The active ingredient CBD, extracted from the Hemp Plant, is a cousin to the Marijuana plant. It does not cause a person to experience intoxication. Intoxication comes from THC, a different component of the plant. There is some THC in CBD oil so it will show up in a urine or blood test, but only a trace amount. This is for an important reason. CBD cannot be absorbed and used by the body without THC. Think of it like milk. Vitamin D is added to milk so that the body can absorb the calcium.

Currently, scientists are looking at CBD use during recovery to see if it assists with the healing process as a neuroprotectant. Other findings indicate that it is effective at managing the most common concussion symptoms such as, pain management for headaches or migraines, sleep disorders, anxiety, and depression. Other areas where CBD is being studied:

Will CBD make me “high”?

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is a very popular topic of conversation. CBD is being studied by medical researchers as an alternative treatment for chronic pain. A common misconception is that its only use is recreational. CBD oil does not intoxicate a person or create a feeling of being “high”. Slowly, this stigma is changing as more people look at its medical use. One of the questions being asked is can CBD oil help with concussion symptoms? Research is in the early stages but there appears to be some benefit. As we hear more about this natural alternative to pharmaceuticals, people are starting to ask, how does it work and can it help me?

Our body naturally produces endocannabinoids, a molecule like the Cannabis molecule. This system plays a very important role in balancing our body. As with anything in life there needs to be balance or homeostasis. When the ECS is not in homeostasis we experience pain, and illness. Research indicates that CBD helps balance the Endocannabinoid system, which is involved in our body’s process of pain, mood, memory, sleep, stress, metabolism, immune function, and reproductive system.

If you would like more information about medical CBD and the benefits it may have for your recovery the Apollo Cannabis Clinic in Ontario can offer information and advice about using Medical Cannabis to help with concussion symptoms.

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This website is for informational purposes only. Consult with your doctor before using medical cannabis products. A valid prescription is required to obtain CBD in New Zealand. We do not sell any CBD products through this website.

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How much CBD oil should I be taking? Check out our comprehensive guide on how much CBD oil you should take based on the condition and condition treated.

Please read our Cannabis Health & Safety page. There appears to be a consensus among researchers that cannabidiol is relatively benign. Consumers typically purchase CBD made from hemp, which contains no more than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Concussion patients are using CBD oil from hemp, which has virtually no THC, or marijuana products (vape, tincture, etc.) with various ratios of CBD and THC.

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In the United States, the first big study on cannabinoid treatment for concussion is being done by the University of Miami which received a $16 million grant for the research. The study is a five-year, three-stage study that will “assess the effectiveness of a new cannabinoid-based pill to treat concussion injuries. This partnership aims to propel this research and potential treatment forward by using two classes of drugs in a combination that scientists believe will reduce brain inflammation and the immune response.” See also the Miami Herald article.

Dr. Hoffer began a new study in February 2020 to research if “using a pill form of cannabidiol (CBD) and the psychedelic drug psilocybin effectively treats and possibly prevents symptoms of two conditions that commonly occur together: mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).” “Up to 40% of people impacted by mTBI [or TBI] also suffer from PTSD,” according to a University of Miami press release.

In Australia, the medical cannabis company Impression Healthcare began a new clinical trial in mid-2020 to access its new cannabinoid formula IHL-216A on “its ability to protect the brain against the main injury mechanisms which cause cell death and other negative consequences in the days and weeks following head trauma.” Impression will test IHL-216A with in-human and animal trials.