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cbd oil dizziness

While rapid-release forms (mouth sprays and oil tinctures) deliver CBD directly into your bloodstream, slow-release forms (capsules, edibles, and teas) have to pass your digestive system first. This means their ingredients may irritate your bowels and give you nausea and diarrhea [76+, 77].

CBD altered the levels of two drug transporters in placental cells. This suggests that taking CBD oil during pregnancy may increase the exposure of the fetus to any drugs that the mother takes. Pregnant women should avoid CBD oil in any case, since safety data are lacking [60].

Unlike THC, CBD doesn’t cause behavioral and psychological side effects. What’s more, it may even reduce some of them such as anxiety, psychosis, and memory loss [5, 6, 7, 8].

How to Reduce Your Risk of Side Effects from CBD Oil

However, rapid-release forms will release CBD faster, so you may experience both wanted and unwanted effects sooner [76+, 77].

Alternatively, the loose regulation of supplements may allow for excessive CBD levels in products or harmful contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, and solvents [16+, 17].

People taking CBD oil often report feeling sleepy and tired. Indeed, this side effect was observed in early clinical trials and one of the most common uses of CBD oil is to improve sleep disorders [20+].

The effect probably involves the TRPV1 receptor, the activation of which increases the brain’s response to stressful situations [42].

It has been used medically to help manage a wide variety of symptoms, including many of those associated with vertigo: nausea, vomiting, headaches, and dizziness.

One of the reasons for this is because the endocannabinoid system is involved in pain regulation. By affecting the receptors in your ECS, CBD can help to reduce pain.

People with this type of vertigo often experience migraines when they move quickly or suddenly. While most of the reports of using CBD for headaches are anecdotal, research has compiled a fair amount of evidence that supports this claim.

References Used In This Article

Recent reviews show that CBD may also be useful for helping to treat vertigo, a condition that causes an unpleasant spinning sensation.

In this article, we’re going to explore some of the ways that CBD may be useful for helping with vertigo.

Anecdotal reports also show that it’s useful for treating headaches and dizziness.

Some of the most common symptoms include nausea, vomiting, and migraines. Here’s how CBD can improve these issues.

Cannabis is a generic term used for drugs produced from plants belong to the genus Cannabis (i.e. marijuana). Cannabis is not a single substance but rather is a mixture of up to roughly 60 compounds. Some of them, like THC (d-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), are psychoactive, and most others are not.

According to Fife et al, Marijuana is a plant of the species Cannabis sativa or Cannabis indica, and contains many chemical compounds. THC is the chief psychoactive component, while CBD (cannabidiol) has minimal or no psychoactive effects. Other cannabinoids without psychoactive properties include cannabigerol and cannabinol. THC can be measured in the blood, while carboxy THC is detected only in the urine. Hemp, made from the stem of the plant, contains only traces of THC. There are several strains of cannabis, mainly differentiated by the their psychoactive properties. "sativa’ is more stimulating. "indica" is more calming. "hemp" has low or absent THC. A single dose of cannabis can be detected in the urine for 12 days. Thus someone who is involved in an auto-accident 10 days after using cannabis, could theoretically be cited for "DUI". One would think that it might be possible to use a non-psychoactive cannabinoid for a medical purpose, without running into issues with mental status. Nevertheless, due to the odd status in the US where research on cannabis has been suppressed by the government, we know little about the non-psychoactive components of Marijuana. We do not know, for example, if they cause cancer (just an example).

What is in Cannabis ?

Prescription forms of cannabinoids include:

As of 2019, cannabis is scheduled to be available for recreational use by early 2020. Presently, In Illinois, the Illinois Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program requires physicians to certify the diagnosis of a debilitating condition or terminal illness for a qualifying patient seeking to apply for a medical cannabis registry identification card. Whether or not a physician chooses to provide a written physician certification is up to the health care practitioner. More information is here: https://www.dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/prevention-wellness/medical-cannabis/physician-information According to Fife et al (2015), the system used in Illinois is the usual one used to handle the odd situation where the Federal government states that licensed physicians cannot legally prescribe herbal marijuana (although they may prescribe nabilone or dronabinol). Physicians can document that the patient has a medical condition that justifies the use of marijuana under that state’s law. Patients then may proceed to acquire the marijuana, under the particulars of the laws of their state. Nevertheless, certain institutions, including the Department of Veteran affairs, may have policies banning physicians from discussing medical marijuana with their patients. Note that THC can be detected in the urine as long as 12 days after a single "dose". This means that in Illinois, should one be involved in an auto accident, it is theoretically possible to be cited for DUI, 12 days after ingesting a small amount of medical marijuana.

Rather astoundingly, Cannabis appears to activate specific endocannabinoid receptors, mainly in the CNS. There are two main cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. According to Baron (2018), CB1 is found mainly in the CNS. CB2 is more numerous in the peripheral tissues. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is a partial agonist of CB1 (more so than CB2). Cannabidiol (CBD) has no psychoactive properties, does not attach to CB1 or CB2, but functions as a noncompetitive antagonist at CB1. The details of what it does to the brain are being worked out and are presently the subject of considerable controversy. While there are claims that cannabis reduces cognitive function, a recent study published in JAMA psychiatry, analyzing 69 studies, suggested that there is only a very small effect after 72 hours (Scott et al, 2018)