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cbd oil for herpes

The herpes breakout can last between 3–7 days, but the virus itself will stay with you for life once you have it. However, most of the time the virus is in the dormant stage, meaning it lies inactive in cell bodies. Most people who have herpes aren’t even aware of it until the flare-ups occur.

Depending on how you want to use CBD oil for herpes, certain products may be more effective than others.

Using that mechanism, CBD may be helpful in preventing herpes breakouts as well as in reducing the severity and recurrence of its symptoms. The best results at using CBD oil for herpes are reported to come from a combination of sublingual and topical formulations. Whichever product you choose for your anti-herpes supplementation, make sure that it contains the full spectrum of cannabinoids and terpenes; doing so will help you maximize the efficacy of your treatment.

Can HSV-1 Cause Genital Herpes? Can HSV-2 Cause Oral Herpes?

The cells affected by the virus become severely damaged, triggering immunoregulatory white blood cells to fight the aftermath of the attack. The said activity causes inflammation and pain, swelling, and manifests in the form of herpes sores and blisters.

That being said, CBD companies often provide their own dosage instructions based on the recommended serving. You can use them as a point of reference. It takes a bit of a trial and error until you find an effective dose for yourself.

A herpes outbreak is more likely to occur during an illness such as the cold or flu, or during prolonged periods of intense stress, or as a result of taking immune-suppressants. Once the virus turns from its dormant to the active stage, it is attacking cell tissues in mucous membranes, which is why outbreaks most commonly appear in moist mucosal areas in the mouth and genitals.

Yes, genital herpes can be easily transmitted from someone with oral herpes. In a similar fashion, a person can get oral herpes from someone with genital herpes. According to statistics, up to 50% of genital herpes cases derive from the HSV-1 virus. The only way to determine which form of the virus you have is to do a mouth swab test and take it to a laboratory for content analysis.

Even more exciting? A 1991 study [2] found that THC reduced infection rates too.

Herpes is a chronic condition – one attached to a huge amount of social stigma, beyond just becoming infected. That can make disease management really difficult. Herpes is highly contagious. Oral herpes is spread fairly easily through simple contact. Sharing a lipstick or kissing can spread it. Unprotected oral sex is another major channel of transmission.

Having the herpes virus means managing a life-long chronic condition. That means there are other lifestyle changes necessary to control the worst symptoms. Maintaining a healthy diet, regularly exercising, and getting enough sleep are critical.

CAN CANNABIS TREAT HERPES?

The good news? It appears that cannabis might be able to treat these conditions. Why? Not only does cannabis have immune-boosting properties, it can also relieve stress in the first place. Cannabinoids appear to reduce the infectiousness of the virus, as well as some of its worst symptoms.

On top of this, consider topical treatment. THC oils and creams, even if you make them yourself, appear to halt both the progression and pain from sores.

The most common forms of the virus are herpes simplex 1 and herpes simplex 2 (or HSV-1 and HSV-2). Oral herpes (HSV-1) might be present in between 30-95% of the population. About 20% of the US population has genital herpes (HSV-2).

Cannabis is one of the main drugs they also turn to.

The present investigation was undertaken to determine whether delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) decreases host resistance to herpes simplex virus type 2 vaginal infection in the guinea pig. The guinea pig was selected as the host since it has been shown to express a spectrum of primary herpes genitalis which is similar to that in humans. Animals were administered delta 9-THC or vehicle intraperitoneally on Days 1-4, 8-11, and 15-18. Herpes simplex virus was introduced intravaginally on Day 2. Host resistance to virus infection was assessed by comparing frequency and severity of lesions, virus shedding, and animal mortalities. Virus-infected animals treated with drug at doses of 4 and 10 mg/kg exhibited significantly greater severity of genital disease during the 30-day period of study when compared to virus-inoculated vehicle controls. A direct relationship was noted between dose of delta 9-THC and cumulative mortalities on Day 14 following primary infection. These results indicate that delta 9-THC decreases host resistance to herpes simplex virus type 2 vaginal infection in the guinea pig.