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cbd oil legal in all 50 states

The marijuana plant has had a long and challenging history regarding legal status in the United States, as well as the rest of the world. To this day it remains banned in most countries.

There are no longer any states outright banning the use of CBD.

A Brief History of Cannabis’ Legal Battle

In other states, like Michigan or Nebraska, CBD is both legal and illegal. The legislature in these states has yet to work out the details of the recent 2018 Farm Bill changes — making it unlikely to be able to buy CBD in these states anywhere but online.

Over the years, it’s become harder to deny the benefits of cannabinoids in the cannabis plant, especially CBD. Thousands of scientific studies have been published highlighting either the benefits of CBD for a specific condition or defining its safety.

CBD is now available in all 50 states of America — to varying degrees. Most citizens can access the supplement in-store legally but may be hard-pressed to find it in some of the stricter states requiring medical cards.

Alaska – Legalized medical marijuana and CBD products that are approved by the FDA.

South Carolina – CBD products are legal in South Carolina as long as it’s below 0.3% THC. Additionally, CBD for medical use is legal as long as it’s below 0.9% THC levels.

Florida – Legalized medical marijuana and CBD products that are approved by the FDA.

Marijuana

Missouri – Legalized medical marijuana and CBD products that are approved by the FDA.

Oklahoma – Excluded the word “marijuana ” when it comes to defining CBD products approved by the FDA. CBD oil and products are legal as well as long as it’s approved by the FDA and has less than 0.3% THC.

As stated before CBD has tons of health benefits and there are multiple researches about it considering its a very potent substance.

Idaho – Legalized medical marijuana and CBD products that are approved by the FDA.

The 2014 Farm Bill is often cited as evidence that CBD derived from industrial hemp is now legal. But the legislation legalized only a very narrow set of hemp cultivation activities: It is legal to grow hemp under a state pilot program or for academic research. It is also legal to cultivate under state law “in which such institution of higher education or state department of agriculture is located and such research occurs.”

But contrary to what these articles suggest, CBD products are not “legal in all 50 US states.” If that were the case, why would Ndiaye be charged with a crime? Why would the Indiana police raid retailers selling the stuff? And why would the Indiana legislature take it upon itself to legalize CBD?

There are certainly CBD producers who source their hemp from cultivators that operate under the Farm Bill. But given how widespread these products are, it’s unlikely that all of them were sourced from research hemp. And state laws on CBD and hemp vary widely. Colorado, which legalized adult-use marijuana in 2012, has a robust industrial hemp program and is home to the first U.S.-bred certified hemp seed. But in Massachusetts, where you can now grow marijuana at home, it’s still a crime to grow hemp without a state license, reported The Boston Globe.

CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a compound found in cannabis that has gained prominence in recent years for its therapeutic properties. Cannabis advocates have hailed the cannabinoid for its promise in combating seizures, anxiety and myriad other ailments. CBD is “the new ‘it’ drug,” according to The Washington Post. It’s a “rapidly rising star for its capacity to deliver mental and physical benefits,” according to Quartz.

Many in the cannabis industry claim that as long as the CBD product contains less than 0.3% THC, it is classified as hemp under federal law and is therefore legal to possess and distribute. (WTHR commissioned a lab test for Ndiaye’s CBD oil — it had 0.00% THC.)

An Indiana man was overwhelmed with emotion this week when a county court dismissed his case.

“It would not be an appropriate use of federal resources to go after a mother because her child has epileptic seizures and has found something that can help and has helped. Are they breaking the law? Yes, they are. Are we going to break her door down? Absolutely not. And I don’t think she’ll be charged by any U.S. Attorney,” DEA spokesperson Rusty Payne told the Indiana news station.