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cbd treatment for dogs

In fact, products made from the hemp plant can provide a number of benefits to dogs of all breeds and all sizes. Here are just a few reasons why you might want your pets to use CBD.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is an increasingly popular natural remedy. Many scientists have vouched for CBD's potential in treating chronic pain, anxiety, and other ailments. And as more and more humans experience the merits of CBD, some are beginning to use it on their dogs as well.

Best for Small Breeds: CBDistillery

If your dog isn’t too fond of a CBD oil, then CBD-infused dog treats may be the answer. Fab CBD makes tasty cookies sans dairy, corn, wheat, or soy. These treats don’t have any THC, but they do come with some beneficial terpenes and cannabinoids, as well as three great dog-friendly flavors to pick from: peanut butter apple (for calming), salmon (for skin and coat health), and chicken (for active immune support).

Many pet owners often wonder what CBD dosage is right for their pup. Unfortunately, there aren't any standard dosing guidelines for pets provided by veterinarians—and exact dosing recommendations can vary by the size of your pet. According ABSC Organics, a brand whose products have been used in multiple clinical trials performed by Colorado State University, here are some baseline dosing recommendations to start your dog off with CBD (based on weight):

CBDistillery has a reputation of high-quality CBD products that are processed with cold-pressed hemp seed oil, which makes them easier for dogs to digest. Not to mention, CBDistillery is one of the most affordable places to purchase hemp products. The 150-milligram tincture is great for small to medium sized dogs, and the 600-milligram pet CBD oil is made for larger breeds.

As some states have begun to legalize both medical and recreational cannabis, the market has enjoyed an influx of readily available CBD, including CBD oil for dogs to treat pain, anxiety, to control seizures and more in the family dog.

Essentially, CBD is non-psychoactive but has a number of the same medical benefits as THC. This means you can take advantage of the therapeutic benefits for your pet without being concerned they will have the “stoned” feeling that goes with THC – which obviously would be very upsetting for a dog.

But, much like the use of CBD in humans, not a lot is known about how CBD oil for dogs works – and if it actually works. According to the American Kennel Club, there have been no formal studies in how it affects dogs, and our expert backed that up.

“The psychotic ingredient in it that makes people high is not present at CBD oil, and they’re not entirely sure how the CBD, the Cannabidiol, actually works to do the things that they’re claiming that it does,” says Verdino. “We don’t know, but they seem to be less reactive to low level pain stimuli, so like arthritis and things like that, when they take the product. And certain anxieties, they seem less reactive to certain things.”

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the many active compounds found in the Cannabis sativa plant. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is another active compound and the most well-known, due to its psychoactive properties — it’s the compound that gets you “high.”

“But can’t someone just buy CBD products?” you might wonder to yourself.

    Dry Mouth: Your dog can’t tell you if they have dry mouth, but it’s safe to say they might increase their water intake. And increased thirst could also be a sign of other serious problems, such as antifreeze or rodenticide poisoning, or conditions like diabetes.

Links to Study Results:

That being said, here are things to keep in mind when you give any unregulated, unstudied supplement to your dog.

The simple story about CBD is that there is no simple story about CBD. Though CBD is a non-psychoactive chemical derived from cannabis or hemp that won’t get people or animals high like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), it still falls into both a medical and bureaucratic black hole where it can be nearly impossible to extract definitive information.

Most vets will agree that you should not give your dog an intoxicating amount of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. There are plenty of reasons why, which you can learn about in “Marijuana, Cannabidiol & Dogs: Everything You Want (And Need) to Know.” The quick and dirty version is that dogs will not enjoy THC the same way you might (or do), and it can actually be dangerous.So is CBD better? Maybe. And that’s about the best information you’ll get out of most vets. (See why the proverbial cat will likely have your vet’s tongue when it comes to talking about CBD for your pets.)