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does cbd help with seizures

This study was able to show that among people with the Dravet syndrome, CBD resulted in a greater decrease in convulsive-seizures than placebo. It also showed that CBD was associated with higher rates of adverse events.

*The Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018 (H.R. 2) legalizes hemp and hemp-derived CBD. The bill changes the definition of hemp to encompass any plant or product derived from the plant that contain less than 0.3% THC by dry weight and classifies them as exempt from the controlled substance restrictions applied to marijuana. The law further amends the Controlled Substances Act to exempt hemp from Schedule I drugs.

Summarized below are the results from a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in May 2018.

Additional Cannabidiol Studies

It is important to know that even though marijuana is a plant, it is broken down in a person’s liver like many medicines. People mistakenly believe that marijuana is completely safe because it is a plant or oil from a plant. However, medication interactions can occur.

In this episode of Hallway Conversations, epilepsy.com Editor-In-Chief Dr. Joseph Sirven interviews Dr. Jose Cavazos MD, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. They discuss Dr. Cavazos’ experience serving as a panelist on the recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drug Advisory Committee review of Epidiolex ® for the treatment of Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes.

Marijuana or cannabis in general has a number of side effects depending on how it is used. For example, if smoked, the negative effect of smoking on a person’s lungs and heart also apply to marijuana.

The Journal of Child Neurology hosted a special report podcast about cannabis on March 6, 2017. In the report, Dr. Alison Christy interviews Dr. Jackie Gofshteyn, a resident in pediatric neurology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, about her article, “Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome (FIRES) in the Acute and Chronic Phases.” Dr. Christy also speaks with epilepsy.com’s medical cannabis editor, Dr. Anup Patel of Nationwide Children’s Hospital, about his article, “Medical Marijuana in Pediatric Neurological Disorders.” Margo Roemeling, a third year medical student at Oregon Health and Sciences University, shares the learning topic on the history and use of marijuana in the treatment of pediatric neurologic conditions.

In August 2019, NICE – the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence – announced that it would not be recommending that cannabidiol, a medicinal cannabis in the form of Epidyolex, should be prescribed on the NHS for children with two severe forms of epilepsy. This is on account of the fact that its long-term effect remains unclear.

Concerns have also been raised about the effect of THC on the developing brain in children and young people. Evidence suggests that chronic exposure to THC can affect brain development, structure and mental health.

Guidance around prescribing cannabis-based products

The British Paediatric Neurology Association (BPNA) has drawn up interim guidance around epilepsy on behalf of NHS England.

The recommended guidelines are still only draft and the consultation closes on 16 September. So there is still time for you to have your say and let them know what you think. Professor Sander will be doing the same. All comments received will be considered by NICE and final guidance is likely to be published in November 2019.

The Government has no plans to legalise the use of cannabis for recreational purposes. Possession of cannabis is illegal. This includes cannabis for medical use unless it has been prescribed for you.