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endoca cbd oil amazon

IS RIGHT FOR YOU?

Endoca offers the best price per milligram of CBD

WHY?

AS SEEN IN

Rich CBD formulas that soothe and moisturize. Packed with organic ingredients.

GENERIC BRANDS HAVE HIGHER CBD PRICES PER MG

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WHICH CBD PRODUCT

UPDATE (March 15, 15): Please consider the recently-released FDA list of questionable CBD oil products (http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm435591.htm)

Now, do we trust ICOMR or are they just working for other manufacturers against UltraCBD? Motivated by my epilepsy, I decided to throw money at it and test their lab results myself by buying a product which their lab results claimed contained at least the advertised amount of CBD, Endoca. Right away, I could tell that the quality of Endoca was far superior than UltraCBD’s (see attached photos). Endoca’s is darker, more uniform, and far more viscous (oily) than the watery, sweetened UltraCBD. Granted, I did get a higher dosage from Endoca (500mg as opposed to 200mg), but product quality-wise, this shouldn’t matter. As for my seizures, I’ve gone over 90 days without a seizure, and haven’t even had a myoclonic spasm since I started taking Endoca (1/12/15; I took UltraCBD from 12/21/14 to 1/10/15). I’ll wait for the medical trials to finish or at least six months seizure-free before claiming Endoca cured my epilepsy, but it’s promising at least.

I became interested in CBD supplements after learning about its anticonvulsant properties (I have a mild form of epilepsy). But because medical trials are still underway, the FDA hasn’t started regulating the sale of CBD, so it’s still a bit of a wild-west out there: sick people are out there getting exploited by sicker people selling snake oil to make a quick buck. The key question here is: Does UltraCBD have the amount of CBD that its manufacturer claims or is it peppermint-flavored snake oil? At least according to the International Cannabidiol Organization of Manufacturers and Research (ICOMR) and their "lab tests", it’s snake oil: http://www.icomr.org/listings/

I became interested in CBD supplements after learning about its anticonvulsant properties (I have a mild form of epilepsy). But because medical trials are still underway, the FDA hasn’t started regulating the sale of CBD, so it’s still a bit of a wild-west out there: sick people are out there getting exploited by sicker people selling snake oil to make a quick buck. The key question here is: Does UltraCBD have the amount of CBD that its manufacturer claims or is it peppermint-flavored snake oil? At least according to the International Cannabidiol Organization of Manufacturers and Research (ICOMR) and their "lab tests", it’s snake oil: http://www.icomr.org/listings/

Now, do we trust ICOMR or are they just working for other manufacturers against UltraCBD? Motivated by my epilepsy, I decided to throw money at it and test their lab results myself by buying a product which their lab results claimed contained at least the advertised amount of CBD, Endoca. Right away, I could tell that the quality of Endoca was far superior than UltraCBD’s (see attached photos). Endoca’s is darker, more uniform, and far more viscous (oily) than the watery, sweetened UltraCBD. Granted, I did get a higher dosage from Endoca (500mg as opposed to 200mg), but product quality-wise, this shouldn’t matter. As for my seizures, I’ve gone over 90 days without a seizure, and haven’t even had a myoclonic spasm since I started taking Endoca (1/12/15; I took UltraCBD from 12/21/14 to 1/10/15). I’ll wait for the medical trials to finish or at least six months seizure-free before claiming Endoca cured my epilepsy, but it’s promising at least.