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is cbd oil legal in alabama

However, because the CBD oil industry is very loosely regulated, it’s of paramount importance to keep an eye on shady companies. They usually offer cheap CBD oil, which, they claim, is a miracle worker for every disease. While it’s perfectly okay to brag about your extraction skills and other qualities that could convince someone to buy from you, lying is a big no-no! CBD is a versatile wellness product, we’re not going to argue with that, but nobody has ever invented a one-fits-all solution for all diseases, mind you.

The skyrocketing popularity of CBD oil has reached the doors of all 50 states, and Alabama, although not the most sought-after state when it comes to cannabis, followed suit. There is a great demand for CBD oil in Alabama due to its natural wellness and health-enhancing benefits. Luckily, there are plenty of stores where you can purchase a bottle of CBD oil in Alabama, but before we get to that part, it’s great to learn what kind of CBD is legal in the state.
Shall we?

Is CBD Oil Legal in Alabama?

Following the 2018 Farm Bill, CBD sourced from industrial hemp is federally legal and applies to all states. Hemp-derived CBD oil falls under the same importation and commerce regulations as other hemp products.
In 2016, the policy HB 393 was enacted to permit hemp cultivation for industrial purposes in Alabama. This legislation permits Alabama companies to create hemp cloth, paper, fuel, and other goods. Industrial hemp is not considered a controlled substance by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

Alabama is one of those states where you don’t want to be caught with marijuana. Possessing any amount of marijuana or its derivatives for personal use is typically penalized with a misdemeanor, carrying up to one year in prison or a $6,000 fine.
Currently, Alabama’s medical marijuana program is still pending and has not been officially enacted. However, CBD has been legal in Alabama since 2014, when the first study on Cannabidiol was conducted at the University of Alabama. When the researchers discovered and examined its benefits, the state’s authorities decided to permit the use of CBD oil if a person suffers from one of the qualifying conditions, such as severe seizures.
In June 2016, Leni’s Law came into force, allowing THC in CBD oil for the aforementioned conditions. However, Leni’s Law allows CBD products to contain up to 3% THC.

If you want to find a trusted CBD oil company, check if they source their CBD from organic, certified industrial hemp, extract their Cannabidiol with CO2, and provide customers with third-party lab testing results to prove the purity and potency meets the label claims.

Although the two plants are in the same family, only CBD oils derived from the industrial hemp plant are approved for use.

Some of its most common uses are for treating seizures, anxiety and relieving pain.

Is CBD Oil Legal in Alabama?

These inconsistencies are partly because the industry is relatively new and not fully regulated. Therefore companies can make claims that may not be entirely true.

Lastly, if the company is making outrageous claims or stating that their products can treat anything under the sun, it is a good sign to be cautious. CBD is useful as a health supplement and treating some symptoms but it isn’t going to fix your broken arm.

The defense provided by Carly’s Law ended July 1, 2019. Luckily, the law was renewed after Gov. Kay Ivey signed Senate Bill 236 into law. The new expiration date of Carly’s Law will be July 1, 2020.

As the FDA slowly determines the rules around CBD’s legality, the buzzwords and descriptors on a product’s label could raise potential red flags about a product’s quality or content. How a CBD product is labeled and marketed plays a critical role in whether the FDA determines it to be lawful, so it’s important to understand what certain words or numbers indicate.

Following the 2014 Farm Bill passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama, the Alabama Legislature passed the Alabama Industrial Hemp Research Program Act in 2016, tasking the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) with the development of a licensing and inspection program for the production of industrial hemp. The ADAI slowly drafted and finalized regulations in September 2018, only months before the 2018 Farm Bill was signed, which broadly legalized CBD and CBD products that contained less than 0.3% THC by weight.

At the ADAI commissioner’s discretion, the department requires regular sample lab testing to confirm that the crop or processed hemp product contains less than 0.3% THC. The grower or processor is responsible for the lab testing fee, which is approximately $200 per sample. There are no requirements for labeling or posting test results for participants in the pilot program.

Where to buy CBD in Alabama

Following the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, Republican Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall affirmed the legality of CBD products that are sold by a licensed vendor and contain no more than 0.3% THC by weight. However, Marshall cautioned buyers to be careful when purchasing, as Alabama has yet to draft regulations for the testing and labeling of CBD products.

In 2018, Congress passed the Farm Bill and legalized hemp cultivation, creating a pathway to remove cannabis from Schedule 1. The Farm Bill defined hemp as cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC by weight and marijuana as cannabis with more than that amount. Hemp-derived CBD was thus removed from its Schedule 1 designation, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered federally illegal because of marijuana’s federally illegal status. Hemp is considered an agricultural commodity, but still must be produced and sold under specific federal regulations, which were not finalized when hemp was legalized.

The rules and regulations around cannabidiol (CBD) in Alabama seem murky on the surface, yet the Yellowhammer State is one of the most CBD-friendly states in the country. Consumers in Alabama enjoy general access to CBD and CBD products that meet the legal definition as outlined in the 2018 Farm Bill, while licensed Alabama-based growers and processors can create and sell industrial hemp products.

The Farm Bill also endowed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the ability to regulate CBD’s labeling, therapeutic claims, and presence in foods or drinks. Despite the Farm Bill’s passage, the FDA has issued a directive that no CBD, even hemp-derived, may be added to food or beverages or marketed as a dietary supplement. As time passes, the FDA has begun re-evaluating that stance on CBD products but has yet to revise rules or specifically regulate CBD products. The FDA’s slow movement has created further confusion on the state level. The FDA has historically been strict when it comes to health claims or content that could be understood as medical advice — and makes no exception for CBD. In July 2019, the FDA sent a letter to Curaleaf warning that the CBD maker was making unproven claims about its effectiveness in treating such conditions attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, cancer, and opioid withdrawal. In April 2019, the FDA also warned three other CBD makers over making unproven health claims.