Posted on

is cbd oil legal in indiana

Update: We no longer recommend purchasing CBD oil locally due to contaminated and untested CBD oils being sold in Indiana stores.

We’re still waiting for Bloomington to bloom with vape and CBD shops, but the city still has a couple of places worth your time. Below you will find the most recommended places for buying CBD oil in Bloomington:

Buying CBD Oil Online in Indiana

Having a quick stop at Fort Wayne? Fear not, as you can find at least one store with hemp-derived CBD oil, as well as a selection of hemp-based products infused with valuable cannabidiol. Since finding more places in Fort Wayne may be challenging, consider buying CBD oil online, especially if you don’t feel like exploring the city to find CBD oil stationarily.

Below you will find a list of the best-rated hemp-based product retailers in Indianapolis, Wayne, Evansville, Bloomington, and South Bend.

When buying CBD oil online, you can actually access a wide range of quality products and trusted manufacturers. Since hemp-based products are legal all over the U.S., you can easily order your desired product from anywhere within the country without having to leave your home. Additionally, it’s a lot easier to do your research on a particular manufacturer to find out whether or not the offered product is worth your money.

However, there is no definitive scientific data on how it affects your canine partner, according to the American Kennel Club.

The law requires manufacturers to have each batch of product tested in order to ensure it has less than 0.3 percent THC. However, the law says nothing about the legality of making CBD oil in Indiana.

The drug has known side effects, including lethargy, diarrhea and elevated liver enzymes, so patients who are taking it need to be carefully monitored by their physician.

What is the CBD oil dosage for dogs?

So, the short answer is probably not.

Here’s what we know about CBD oil.

CBD or cannabidiol, is one of many compounds — called cannabinoids — found in cannabis sativa, and it is extracted from the hemp variety, which has no or only trace amounts of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound that produces the mind-altering “high” associated with marijuana. Hemp also has a higher cannabidiol content than marijuana.

Cannabidiol can come in the form of an ointment, a liquid or pill form and is popular as a cosmetic (including mascara). It has reportedly also been used for relaxation by patients with anxiety disorders and for pain management and other uses. Others use CBD oil to reduce inflammation or regulate their metabolism.

The cultivation of industrial hemp and the sale of CBD products derived from industrial hemp are legal. Following the 2014 Farm Bill, Gov. Mike Pence signed IC 15-15-13, the Industrial Hemp Act, into law in 2014. This act authorized the Office of the Indiana State Chemist and Seed Commissioner to provide licenses for the cultivation of industrial hemp crops for research purposes in partnership with Purdue University. The legislation did not provide for consumers to access hemp products.

Only individuals with a license from the Office of the Indiana State Chemist are authorized to grow industrial hemp crops or to process hemp products. The yields of those who grow without licenses will be defined as marijuana, and violators may be prosecuted. The cultivation of cannabis without a license is punishable by tiers of incarceration and fines.

Indiana CBD laws

After the passing of the Farm Bill, Indiana lawmakers swiftly drafted and passed SB 516. SB 516 further aligned Indiana’s terminology with that of the federal government and banned smokable CBD flower. However, there are no rules at present in Indiana that ban the use of CBD in food, beverages, or cosmetics.

The cultivation of hemp for research purposes was made legal in Indiana in 2014, under the Industrial Hemp Act. Following the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, Indiana lawmakers are currently drafting regulations to license and operate commercial Indiana-based hemp growers and processors.

The 2018 Farm Bill shifted the oversight of hemp and hemp-derived products from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA does not presently allow CBD-infused food, drinks, or dietary supplements to be sold, and hasn’t yet provided regulations for hemp-derived CBD products.