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is smoking hemp oil bad for you

The vaping method is discreet, and since vape juice is available in a variety of flavors, the experience is tastier. Plus, you get the benefit of increased bioavailability, because the vapor containing CBD is absorbed through your lungs.

A recent study published by Addictive Behaviors demonstrates that CBD may help some people quit smoking cigarettes. The study revealed that nicotine smokers who used a CBD inhaler throughout their day smoked significantly fewer cigarettes, and reported a decrease in their nicotine cravings.

In another clinical trial by researchers at the University College of London, CBD oil was found to help people wishing to quit smoking. Their study demonstrated the CBD oil significantly reduced the number of cigarettes the study participants smoked by about 40%.

Indiscreetness

Now, the most popular form of CBD oil use is oral ingestion. However, more and more people are exploring alternatives such as smoking, vaping, and infusing CBD into edibles. Keep in mind that your method of CBD consumption will play a key role in how long it will take to experience the benefits of this non-psychoactive cannabinoid.

No matter how you choose to take your CBD oil, all forms deliver the same suggested benefits, although how quickly they appear or how long they last will differ. Still, there are certain advantages associated with smoking CBD

As mentioned, the short answer is yes. There are actually a few ways to smoke CBD oil, and you can choose one based on your preference and convenience.

Vape pens and CBD vape juice: vape juices are typically made from a CBD extract combined with a solute. Since CBD isn’t water-soluble, the solutions are made by mixing the CBD extract with another substance such as MCT oil, propylene glycol, or polyethylene glycol.

The long-term effect on human health of repeated use of these solvents is virtually unknown. There have been few animal or human studies on the safety of propylene glycol or vegetable glycerine when inhaled, especially long-term, according to a 2018 National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report.

To address the possible danger—and because flavors such as fruit and mint might attract children and teens—the FDA recently banned flavorings except menthol and tobacco in most nicotine vaping products. The agency will now require manufacturers to provide evidence that their flavor additives are safe to be inhaled before they can be marketed and sold.

All those concerns take on added urgency now as the popularity of CBD continues to grow, and vaping remains one of the most popular ways of using it. Sales of CBD overall are expected to nearly triple in the next five years to $1.6 billion, according to the Brightfield Group, which tracks the CBD industry. And nearly a third of Americans who tried CBD in the past 24 months—an estimated 20 million people—said they vaped the substance, according to a January 2019 CR nationally representative survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults. Even after the lung-injury crisis made headlines, fewer than a quarter of people who vape CBD said they changed their habits, according to the Brightfield Group.

Dangerous Byproducts

In addition to the solvents in vape oils being potentially dangerous by themselves, the byproducts that can be created when the solvents are heated to high temperatures are also dangerous. For example, heating propylene glycol can create formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, and acetaldehyde, a possible carcinogen, both of which are also present in cigarette smoke, Benowitz says.

Gilbert had been vaping CBD for just four days when she developed a fever, shortness of breath, cough, vomiting, and diarrhea, and went to a St. Croix emergency room. There she went into acute respiratory failure and had to be moved to Miami, according to legal documents in her ongoing lawsuit against multiple defendants, including the alleged maker of the CBD product, JustCBD. But Gilbert’s condition worsened, and as her organs shut down, her blood became toxic. Serious clots restricting blood flow formed in her legs, both of which had to be amputated, the suit alleges.

Gilbert’s lawyers said that neither they nor their client would comment on the case at this time. Terry Fahn, a spokesperson for JustCBD, told CR that the company does not sell products in the U.S. Virgin Islands and that it “has received numerous reports of counterfeits” and it believes that Gilbert’s injuries may have stemmed from “using a counterfeit product illegally sold through the black market.”

CBD is a nonpsychoactive compound found in cannabis plants, which include hemp and marijuana, that is often used to ease anxiety, insomnia, and pain.