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medical cbd oil for seizures

However, LGS and Dravet syndrome may be treated with medications that aren’t commonly used for most types of epilepsy. Additionally, they often require two or more anti-seizure drugs for seizures to be under control.

In the aforementioned 2019 review of studies on this drug, however, researchers found that while adding Epidiolex to a treatment regimen may increase certain specific side effects, it may actually decrease the overall amount of side effects participants experienced.

How It Works

There’s still much to be learned about how CBD interacts with other anti-seizure drugs.  

However, these products aren’t regulated by the FDA and are largely untested. The FDA has warned that CBD products are often mislabeled or overpromise their supposed benefits.  Dosage and quality are likely to be far less consistent with other CBD products, which may put you at risk for more seizures.

However, studies have shown that CBD, when taken with other anti-seizure medications, reduces the frequency and severity of seizures in people who have these disorders.  

The safety data from the trials in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome has shown similar side effects. Tiredness, diarrhea, and upset stomach are reported the most. Interestingly, people getting the placebo also reported diarrhea and upset stomach feeling as well. This may be due to both products being oil.

The FDA approval and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) scheduling of Epidiolex brings to market the first plant-based drug derived from the cannabis plant in the U.S.

Summarized below are results from the May 2017 New England Journal of Medicine study examining the effectiveness of Epidiolex (CBD) in people with drug resistant seizures with Dravet syndrome.

Should I worry about drug interactions?

NEJM May 2018

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NEJM May 2017

Early evidence from laboratory studies, anecdotal reports, and small clinical studies over a number of years suggest that cannabidiol (CBD) could potentially help control seizures. Research on CBD has been hard to do and taken time due to federal regulations and limited access to cannabidiol. There are also many financial and time constraints. In recent years, a number of studies have shown the benefit of specific plant-based CBD product in treating specific groups of people with epilepsy who have not responded to traditional therapies.

Perhaps the biggest hurdle of all is price. The Pearsons pay $350 per month for Trysten’s CBD oil—a typical amount—and the cost isn’t covered by insurance. That’s unlikely to change, experts say, as long as the federal government views cannabis as a Schedule I drug with no accepted medical use. In May, a federal appeals court sided with the Drug Enforcement Administration, ruling that CBD oil is a Schedule I controlled substance. But in June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex, a CBD oral solution to treat seizures associated with rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

Doctors, patients and advocates are quick to point out CBD oil isn’t a miracle cure. It doesn’t eradicate epilepsy and it doesn’t help everyone. But for some patients, it can help eliminate or reduce their symptoms, and it may allow them to ease off of other drugs that have serious side effects, including anemia, low platelet levels, liver failure, pancreatitis, allergic reactions and suicidal tendencies.

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Teachers told Shena that Trysten was less distracted at school and that his performance had improved. In his first 30 days on his new treatment, he had just one seizure. He hasn’t felt this well for the past three years.

“I really wanted this medicine to work because of how many times pills have failed me,” said Trysten, who takes drops of the oil orally. “Once I started taking it, I felt so much better. I don’t have seizures.”

Across Texas, doctors and patients are now finally able to take advantage of a three-year-old law that makes cannabidiol oil, or CBD oil, available to some epilepsy patients. CBD oil is derived from the cannabis plant, also known as marijuana. CBD oil provides symptom relief without intoxicating effects.

In June 2015, Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law the Texas Compassionate Use Act after it passed both chambers of the state legislature by wide, bipartisan margins. But it wasn’t until late 2017 that the state issued full licenses to the only three businesses in Texas that can now legally provide CBD oil to prescribed patients.