Posted on

what is cannabis oil for

Medical Marijuana, Inc. is the industry leader when it comes to cannabis oil uses, creating a wide selection of products so that patients can choose a CBD oil product that best suits their individual needs. Our full-spectrum hemp oil products are made with high-quality CBD oil that was sourced from organic, natural hemp.

Hemp oil is widely available from health food stores, yoga studios, medical practitioners, alternative medicine stores, and more. The primary use of hemp oil is to encourage wellness because it contains high levels of CBD.

To access medical marijuana in most states where it is legal, you will need a doctor’s recommendation to use medical marijuana for an approved medical condition. Once you obtain your doctor’s recommendation, you can access marijuana from a licensed dispensary near your home.

What are the Best Cannabis Oil Uses and Products?

When making hemp oil, many producers choose to use a non-toxic solvent such as supercritical CO2 to extract the hemp plant’s natural oil.

It is possible to use solvent-based extraction techniques to pull the cannabis plant’s oil from cured or fresh ground cannabis material. Some popular solvents that are commonly used for extraction include butane, hexane, and isopropyl. Some extraction solvents may be toxic if not properly purged from the marijuana oil, making it critical that extraction should only be done by professionals in a licensed facility.

Extracted cannabis oil is the raw material that makes it possible to create a wide variety of cannabis products, including cannabis edibles, capsules, vapes, tinctures, beverages, dab oils, and more. Cannabis oil is also commonly taken raw and unprocessed as a high concentration way to capture the cannabis plant’s nutrients and cannabinoids.

RSHO® is an award-winning brand that specializes in CBD oil concentrate products. All RSHO® products are typically available in four different varieties and all feature high concentrations of CBD. Some RSHO® CBD oil products include:

It’s a little more uniform when the product is absorbed by smoking or vaping the oil, Ward said. But, “there are obvious concerns about smoking something.” A 2007 review published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that smoking marijuana resulted in similar declines in respiratory system health as smoking tobacco. A similar review published in 2014 in The American Journal of Cardiology found that marijuana smoke inhalation can increase the chances of heart attack or stroke. Neither review analyzed the effects of vaping cannabis oil alone, so it’s unclear if it has the same health risks as smoking other marijuana products.

Simply put, cannabis oil is the concentrated liquid extract of the marijuana plant, Cannabis sativa.

A review published in 2017 in the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology described how CBD may work to protect the hippocampus — the part of the brain responsible for several important functions, such as learning, memory and navigation — during times of stress, and may also help prevent brain-cell destruction that results from schizophrenia. Another 2017 review published in the journal Annals of Palliative Medicine summarized a handful of studies that suggest cannabis oils containing THC or CBD, or both, may help with chronic pain management, but the mechanism is unclear.

Why do people use cannabis oil?

Both Bonn-Miller and Ward stress that it’s up to the consumer to be well-educated about the material they’re purchasing and the research that’s out there. “The companies that are creating [cannabis oils] are offering lots of claims about its use that are not necessarily substantiated by any research,” Bonn-Miller said. So “I think there needs to be, from a consumer standpoint, a lot of vigilance,” he added.

The popularity of medical marijuana is soaring, and among the numerous products consumers are seeking are CBD, or cannabis oils.

A wealth of marketing material, blogs and anecdotes claim that CBD oils can cure whatever ails you, even cancer. But the limited research doesn’t suggest that cannabis oil should take the place of conventional medication, except for in two very rare forms of epilepsy (and even then, it’s recommended only as a last-resort treatment). And, experts caution that because CBD oil and other cannabis-based products are not regulated or tested for safety by the government or any third-party agency, it’s difficult for consumers to know exactly what they’re getting.

Because of this classification, it’s not easy for researchers to get their hands on the drug. “That’s not to say you can’t do it, but there are hoops you need to jump through that can be a pain, which may deter researchers from going into this space,” Bonn-Miller said. “Relatively speaking, it’s a small group of people in the U.S. that do research on cannabinoids in humans.”

CBD oil may also increase liver enzymes (a marker of liver inflammation). People with liver disease should use CBD oil with caution, ideally under the care of a doctor who can regularly check blood liver enzyme levels.

CBD oil can interact with certain medications, including some drugs used to treat epilepsy. CBD inhibits an enzyme called cytochrome P450 (CYP450), which metabolizes certain drugs. By interfering with CYP450, CBD may either increase the toxicity or decrease the effectiveness of these drugs.

CBD oil is an extract of Cannabis indica or Cannabis sativa—the same plants that, when dried, make marijuana. CBD oil is believed by some to treat pain, reduce anxiety, and stimulate appetite in the same way that marijuana does, but without its psychoactive effects. CBD has also shown promise in treating certain types of seizures.

Interactions

CBD oil should be avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding. A 2018 study from the American Academy of Pediatrics warned women to avoid marijuana during pregnancy due to the potential risks to a baby’s development. Although it is unclear how CBD contributes, CBD is known to pass through the placental barrier.

Part of this response could be explained by the way that CBD acts in the brain. In low doses, CBD may act as an agonist to several receptor sites, meaning it acts similarly to surrounding molecules that normally bind to the receptor, enhancing the signalling of those receptor sites. At higher doses, however, too much activity at the receptor site can lead to an opposite effect, negating the beneficial effects of CBD.

According to a 2017 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, only 30.95% of CBD products sold online were correctly labeled. Most contained less CBD than advertised, while 21.43% had significant amounts of THC.

Meredith Bull, ND, is a licensed naturopathic doctor with a private practice in Los Angeles, California.